7 December 2021

19:00

This talk will explore cross-disciplinary collaborations between art, science and technology in particular data-driven practices in medical science. During the session artist Joey Holder will present and discuss her work Ophiux which will be followed by an open conversation led by artist Lucy Hutchinson to discuss emerging questions about the use of data in healthcare and the role of artists in research. This session has been organised by A/WA member Lucy Hutchinson.

This session is free to attend and will be held on Zoom. Please register by emailing info (at) artworkassociation.org. Registered attendees will receive the link 10 minutes in advance of the discussion

Lucy Hutchinson has a research-based practice which often considers social histories and futures through multiple voices and viewpoints. Much of her work looks at how histories are repeated and mutate whilst searching for alternative tools which challenge dominant narratives. Her practice develops primarily through drawing but expands into computer generated animation, 3D printing, etching and writing.

Joey Holder’s work raises philosophical questions of our universe and things yet unknown, regarding the future of science, medicine, biology and human-machine interactions. Working with scientific and technical experts she makes immersive, multimedia installations that explore the limits of the human and how we experience non-human, natural and technological forms. Mixing elements of biology, nanotechnology and natural history against computer programme interfaces, screensavers and measuring devices, she suggests the impermanence and interchangeability of these apparently contrasting and oppositional worlds: ‘everything is a mutant and a hybrid’. Connecting forms which have emerged through our human taste, culture and industrial processes she investigates complex systems that dissolve notions of the ‘natural’ and the ‘artificial’. GM products, virtual biology and aquatic creatures are incorporated into an extended web; challenging our perception of evolution, adaptation and change.

Image: Ophiux, 2016, Joey Holder. Courtesy of the artist.